Eka Software Announces Rapid Adoption of Commodity Analytics Cloud across Multiple Industries throughout the World

Eka Software Solutions In the first six months of availability, seven enterprise customers in the US, Europe, Australia, Asia, and Canada have licensed Commodity Analytics Cloud.

 

Eka Software Solutions, the leading global provider of Smart Commodity Management software, announced today the growing momentum of…

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Reforming Indian banks: Bureaucrats at the till

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Under attack

Fly Title: 

Reforming Indian banks

Location: 

MUMBAI

Main image: 

20160604_FNP003_0.jpg

Rubric: 

The financial sector in India is being improved rather than overhauled

INDIA’S biggest banks tend to have official-sounding names, worthy of a central bank. There is State Bank of India, Union Bank of India, Bank of India and even Central Bank of India (the actual central bank is called the Reserve Bank of India, or RBI). That is because, starting in 1969, the entire financial system was nationalised. Although the government has grudgingly permitted private-sector banks over the past 20 years, the 27 public-sector banks (PSBs), which are listed but majority-owned by the government, still account for 70% of lending. That is a worry, because the PSBs are in terrible shape, having lent freely to companies that cannot pay them back. In response, both the government and the RBI are …

Reforming Indian banks: Bureaucrats at the till

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Under attack

Fly Title: 

Reforming Indian banks

Location: 

MUMBAI

Main image: 

20160604_FNP003_0.jpg

Rubric: 

The financial sector in India is being improved rather than overhauled

INDIA’S biggest banks tend to have official-sounding names, worthy of a central bank. There is State Bank of India, Union Bank of India, Bank of India and even Central Bank of India (the actual central bank is called the Reserve Bank of India, or RBI). That is because, starting in 1969, the entire financial system was nationalised. Although the government has grudgingly permitted private-sector banks over the past 20 years, the 27 public-sector banks (PSBs), which are listed but majority-owned by the government, still account for 70% of lending. That is a worry, because the PSBs are in terrible shape, having lent freely to companies that cannot pay them back. In response, both the government and the RBI are …

Indian banking: Of banks and bureaucrats

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Under attack

Fly Title: 

Indian banking

Main image: 

20160604_LDD002_0.jpg

Rubric: 

Proposed reforms to India’s financial system are welcome but insufficient

BANKS are usually reliable barometers of the health of the economies they help finance. So news in recent days that India’s lenders have lost over 200 billion rupees ($3 billion) in the most recent quarter sits oddly with zippy growth in GDP of 7.9%. A revving economy may help the banks overcome their weakness. Far likelier is the opposite outcome: that the Indian economy ends up being damaged by its lenders.
Most of the trouble lies in India’s state-owned banks, a network of 27 listed but government-controlled entities that account for 70% of India’s banking system by assets (see article). Their share prices have tumbled ever since the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), the central bank and regulator, sensibly forced them to confess to past mistakes. A staggering 17% of the loans they made in a mini credit …

Indian banking: Of banks and bureaucrats

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Under attack

Fly Title: 

Indian banking

Main image: 

20160604_LDD002_0.jpg

Rubric: 

Proposed reforms to India’s financial system are welcome but insufficient

BANKS are usually reliable barometers of the health of the economies they help finance. So news in recent days that India’s lenders have lost over 200 billion rupees ($3 billion) in the most recent quarter sits oddly with zippy growth in GDP of 7.9%. A revving economy may help the banks overcome their weakness. Far likelier is the opposite outcome: that the Indian economy ends up being damaged by its lenders.
Most of the trouble lies in India’s state-owned banks, a network of 27 listed but government-controlled entities that account for 70% of India’s banking system by assets (see article). Their share prices have tumbled ever since the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), the central bank and regulator, sensibly forced them to confess to past mistakes. A staggering 17% of the loans they made in a mini credit …